Business classes in Latin in Cardiff? I mean, really?

Ever get the feeling that a website just parrots back your search query in order to build traffic, usually in the hopes of getting you to buy something? It's generally considered a pretty bad SEO strategy, as the click throughs from a search engine will usually just result in disappointment, the user leaving quickly, and a bad rep (which = bad Google juice). Such is a site I stumbled across looking for Latin courses in my local area, which promises, on a page adorned with stock-looking images of generically young businessy types:

Latin Courses in Cardiff


Our native-speaking, qualified Latin teachers will tailor your individual or group language course to suit your personal learning aims and Latin level. They are available to conduct classes in your home or office in Cardiff, on a day and at a time that suits you. Course books are included, and timetables can often be as flexible as you need.
 I was very impressed that they'd managed to procure "native-speaking" Latin tutors, clearly they must have a strong recruitment branch in Vatican City. They go on to offer not just a "focus will be on building conversational skills for common, real-life Latin situations" but all sorts of ways they will tailor your Latin lessons to the specific needs of business and industry.

Each section has a big, bold orange "BOOK NOW" button.

Clearly this is the mail merge, mad libs (try replacing "Latin" with an expletive of your choice) approach to website content. And no, I will not be booking any courses with you, no matter how pressing the business needs for Latin may be. I think I'll go with the Classical Education Forum, who have risen from the ashes of the obliteration of humanities teaching at Cardiff University's Lifelong Learning unit.

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